Category

4th Circuit

12 January 2018

Fourth Circuit Clarifies Legal Standard for a FCA Retaliation Claim

While there generally has been no question that the False Claims Act protects employees who suffer retaliation because of reporting suspected fraud by their employer, the Fourth Circuit recently made clear that the FCA whistleblower provisions protect disclosures that could lead to any viable FCA action regardless of whether the target is the employer of the whistleblower.   O’Hara v. NIKA Technologies, Inc., No. 16-1805, _ F.3d. _, 2017 WL 6542675 (4th Cir. Dec. 22, 2017).  This decision raises the bar for employers who learn of employees’ concerns about third-parties allegedly committing fraud on the government in the event the company takes subsequent adverse employment action against the so-called whistleblower. (more…)

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22 May 2017

Fourth Circuit Rules that Falsity Under Escobar Does Not Require Specific Misrepresentations

Courts have focused their attention post-Escobar primarily on whether plaintiffs have met the heightened standard for pleading the violation of a material statute, regulation, or contractual requirement. Under the implied certification theory claims must also still be false, yet the Supreme Court in Escobar provided less guidance as to the contours of falsity. The Fourth Circuit recently advanced a broad definition that permits plaintiffs to avoid pointing to any specific misrepresentations. See United States ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy, Inc., No. 13-2190 (4th Cir. May 16, 2017).

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03 March 2017

Fourth Circuit Affirms Defense Summary Judgment Based on Government Declarations

As we previously discussed here, the government’s continued payment despite knowledge of contractual or regulatory noncompliance has become a powerful defense argument post-Escobar.  The Fourth Circuit recently affirmed summary judgment in favor of government contractors after they obtained declarations from responsible government officials that undercut the relator’s theories of liability.  See United States ex rel. Searle v. DRS C3 & Aviation Co., No. 15-2442 (4th Cir. Feb. 23, 2017).

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21 February 2017

Statistical Sampling Update: Fourth Circuit Ruling and Upcoming Sidley Webinar

The extent to which statistical sampling can be used to establish FCA liability remains a hotly disputed topic among federal courts.  In a closely watched case, the Fourth Circuit last week declined to become the first circuit court directly to address the issue.  See United States ex rel. Michaels v. Agape Senior Cmty., Inc., No. 15-2145 (4th Cir. Feb. 14, 2017).

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30 November 2016

Fourth Circuit Sets Out Framework For Successor Liability Under FCA

The Fourth Circuit ruled recently in U.S. ex rel. Bunk v. Government Logistics N.V., No. 15-1088, 2016 WL 6695787 (4th Cir. Nov. 15, 2016), that the Relators had presented sufficient evidence to proceed to trial against Defendant Government Logistics (GovLog) based on the traditional fraudulent transaction theory of successor liability.  The Court declined, however, to expand the scope of successor liability under the FCA to include the substantial continuation theory, which, as discussed here, would have allowed Relators to establish liability by showing merely that GovLog retained its predecessor’s employees, managers, assets, and operations, among other indicia of corporate continuity. See United States v. Carolina Transformer, 978 F.2d 832, 840 (4th Cir. 1992).

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02 November 2016

Fourth Circuit Appears Inclined to Avoid Sampling Question

As we reported here and here, the question of whether statistical sampling can be used to establish FCA liability became intertwined in a Fourth Circuit interlocutory appeal challenging the government’s assertion that it has unfettered authority to veto FCA settlements.  United States ex rel. Michaels v. Agape Senior Cmty., Inc., No. 15-2145 (4th Cir.).  During oral arguments last week, the Fourth Circuit panel demonstrated a clear preference for avoiding the sampling component of the appeal, likely leaving the lower courts to continue to develop a piecemeal approach.

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21 April 2016

Fourth Circuit To Consider Successor Liability For FCA Violations

The Fourth Circuit will soon have the opportunity to clarify the circumstances under which successor liability may be imposed against an entity for False Claims Act judgments against its predecessor.  Previously covered here, here, here, here, here, and here, the district court in United States ex rel. Bunk v. Birkart Globistics GmbH & Co. held that purported defendant GovLog could be defendant Gosselin’s successor in interest only if the plaintiffs – the Department of Justice and relators – could establish the elements of successor liability under the more-demanding common law rule instead of the more-lenient “substantial continuity” rule.  Under the common law (or “traditional”) rule of successor liability, a corporation that acquires the assets of another corporation does not also assume its liabilities under the FCA unless either: (1) the successor agrees to assume liability; (2) the transaction is a de facto merger; (3) the successor is a “mere continuation” of the predecessor; or (4) the transaction is fraudulent.

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21 March 2016

Debate About Statistical Sampling, DOJ Authority to Reject Settlements, Continues In Fourth Circuit

As we reported here, the Fourth Circuit is currently facing a unique case presenting the question of whether the government has an unfettered veto authority over FCA settlements and, if not, whether the district court erred in rejecting the government’s objections to a settlement.  See United States ex rel. Michaels v. Agape Senior Cmty., Inc., No. 15-2145 (4th Cir.).  Notably, the government’s objections were premised on the use of statistical sampling to establish FCA liability, adding to the dispute a critical issue that has been generating significant debate.

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05 February 2016

Fourth Circuit Affirms Dismissal Under Public Disclosure Bar Where Relators’ Counsel Had Previously Represented Another Relator Whose Identical Qui Tam Claims Were Dismissed

Suppose you’re a relator who files a qui tam case against your former employer only to see your case dismissed on the grounds that you released the claims as part of accepting a severance package from your employer.  Can your wife or another former employee who didn’t sign the release subsequently retain the lawyer who represented you in your qui tam case and file her own lawsuit making identical claims against your former employer?  Not in the Fourth Circuit, as a result of a January 29, 2016 panel decision in U.S. ex rel. May v. Purdue Pharma L.P., No. 14-2299.

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21 January 2016

Relators Urge Fourth Circuit to Limit DOJ Authority to Veto FCA Settlements

Under what circumstances can the government veto a settlement between a relator and the defendant in a case in which the government has not intervened?  As previously reported here, that is a question that has divided the Circuits, and one that the Fourth Circuit will soon be deciding.  See United States ex rel. Michaels v. Agape Senior Cmty., Inc., No. 15-2145 (4th Cir.).

The district court held that the plain language of the FCA gives the government absolute veto authority, adopting the approach of the Fifth and Sixth Circuits, and rejecting a Ninth Circuit ruling that the government has unreviewable veto authority only during the period following the filing of a qui tam suit when the government is deciding whether to intervene.  Under the Ninth Circuit rule, once the government declines to intervene, government rejections of settlements are subject to a reasonableness review by the Court.

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