Category

Procedure

23 September 2019

Third Circuit Holds That A Live Hearing Is Not Required When Government Seeks To Dismiss FCA Complaint Over Relator’s Objection

The Third Circuit recently held that relators are not automatically entitled to an in-person hearing when the government moves to dismiss a qui tam suit over the relator’s objection. U.S. ex rel Chang v. Children’s Advocacy Center of Delaware, No. 18-2311 (3d Cir. Sept. 12, 2019). Weih Chang filed qui tam lawsuit in 2015 alleging the Children’s Advocacy Center of Delaware had misrepresented material information when applying for governmental funding. After a lengthy investigation, the United States declined intervention and moved to dismiss under the statutory provision that allows dismissal, “notwithstanding the objections of the person initiating the action if the person has been notified by the Government of the filing of the motion and the court has provided the person with an opportunity for a hearing on the motion.” 31 U.S.C. § 3730(c)(2)(A). The district court granted the motion to dismiss, holding that the government had shown a legitimate interest in dismissing the suit and Chang had not met the burden of showing that the move to dismiss was arbitrary or capricious. Chang appealed, arguing that he had a statutory right to an in-person hearing prior to dismissal and that at the hearing he could have introduced evidence to show that the dismissal was arbitrary and capricious. Id. at *5-6. The Third Circuit affirmed the district court opinion, holding the court had not erred in granting dismissal without conducting an in-person hearing. Id. at 8.

(more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
24 January 2019

District Court Rejects Relators’ Pursuit of Independent Claims After Government Intervention, and Finds Government’s Allegations of Knowledge Insufficient

When a relator brings a civil action for a violation of the FCA, the Government “may elect to intervene and proceed with the action,” and, thereafter, the Government “shall have the primary responsibility for prosecuting the action.”  31 U.S.C. 3730(b)(2), (c)(1).  In United States ex rel. Brooks, et al. v. Stevens-Henager College, Inc., et al., No. 2:15-cv-00199, 2019 WL 186663 (D. Utah Jan. 14, 2019), a judge in the District of Utah addressed the issue of “whether a relator retains an independent right to maintain the non-intervened portion of an action” in which the Government only partially intervened.  The district court held that, under the plain language and legislative history of the statute, the relator has no right to litigate the non-intervened portions of the case. (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
20 November 2018

Court Compels Medicare Advantage Plan to Comply With CID for Testimony in Diagnosis Coding Investigation

On November 13, 2018, a magistrate judge issued a report to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York recommending that the Department of Justice’s (“DOJ”) petition to compel deposition testimony from Anthem regarding its procedures and processes for verifying diagnoses for Medicare Advantage payments be granted and that a date be set for Anthem’s witness to testify.  DOJ is seeking the testimony in connection with its investigation of Anthem as part of its broader enforcement efforts under the FCA focused on the Medicare Advantage program.  (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
05 November 2018

How Long Under Seal is Too Long?

On October 16, a Philadelphia federal district court rejected the government’s eleventh request for an extension of the seal so that it could continue to investigate five-year-old allegations brought under the False Claims Act qui tam provisions.  See United States ex rel. Brasher v. Pentec Health, Inc., No. 13-05745, 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 177118 (E.D. Pa. Oct. 16, 2018).  The suit, first filed by relator in 2013, alleges that Pentec Health defrauded Medicare when it submitted fraudulent bills to the government health insurance program.  In denying the request, U.S. Judge Eduardo C. Robreno of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania determined the government had failed to show good cause for an eleventh extension of the seal period and ordered it to decide within 30 days if it will intervene in the suit. (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
13 August 2018

Massachusetts Prohibits Entities From Being Relators

We are increasingly seeing the use of entities as relators, in lieu of individuals.  In some instances these relator entities are actual businesses, though frequently they are special purpose entities formed for the sole purpose of pursuing qui tam litigation.  There are a number of reasons for this trend, including that the use of an entity may be used to keep secret the names of individual relator-plaintiffs secret even after unsealing, and the belief that by using a corporate entity, individual whistleblowers can be added or replaced in the event of jurisdictional problems. (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
09 July 2018

District Court Dismisses Original Source’s FCA Claims as Barred by Government’s Pursuit of Penalty in Bankruptcy Proceeding

The government action bar provides that a relator may not bring a False Claims Act (FCA) lawsuit “based upon allegations or transactions which are the subject of a civil suit or an administrative civil money penalty proceeding in which the Government is already a party.”  31 U.S.C. § 3730(e)(3) (emphasis added).  Recently, in Schagrin v. LDR Industries, LLC, No. 14 C 9125, 2018 WL 2332252 (N.D. Ill. May 23, 2018), a district court held that the relators’ lawsuit was barred by the “government action bar” because LDR Industries had already been subject to administrative penalties by U.S. Customs for the same alleged conduct. (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
11 May 2018

DOJ Defends Use of Statistical Sampling To Prove FCA Liability

In a case in which it chose not to intervene, DOJ has stepped in to defend the relator’s attempt to use statistical sampling to prove FCA liability.  The relators allege that Select Medical Corporation, a related entity in Evansville, Indiana, and a physician violated the FCA by making medically unnecessary admissions to long term care facilities and increasing reimbursements by manipulating patients’ lengths of stay and falsifying diagnoses.  The relators contend that their claims encompass Select’s facilities nationwide, and advised the Court that they intended to propose a plan to use statistical sampling to establish FCA liability based on evaluation of a subset of medical records from facilities throughout the country.  The defendants contend that the claims should be limited to the named facility in Evansville. (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
04 May 2018

DOJ Backs Down From Challenge to CIDs Issued After It Declined to Intervene in FCA Case

Faced with a challenge to its authority to do so, DOJ recently withdrew several Civil Investigative Demands (“CIDs”) which it had issued after declining to intervene in a qui tam case brought by former employees who had accused their employer, Lexington Foot & Ankle Center PSC, of fraudulent billing.  In re Civil Investigative Demands 18-13-EDKY, 18-02-EDKY, and 18-03-EDKY, No. 5:18-cv-00283 (E.D. Ky.) (filed Apr. 23, 2018).  (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
14 June 2017

New Jersey Supreme Court Curtails Attorney General’s Subpoena Power in FCA Action

On June 7, 2017, the New Jersey Supreme Court, in a 3-2 decision affirming the decision of the Appellate Division, found that the Attorney General’s administrative subpoena power under New Jersey’s False Claims Act is limited to the 60 day period (which may be extended by motion) in which the Attorney General must make his or her intervention decision. “[A]fter the Attorney General declines to intervene in a qui tam action and leaves that action in the relator’s control, the Attorney General loses the authority to issue administrative subpoenas.” In the Matter of the Enforcement of New Jersey False Claims Act Subpoenas, A-5-16 (No. 077506). (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
10 May 2017

DOJ Has Substantial Discretion To Settle Cases Over Relator’s Objection, Eleventh Circuit Holds

In United States ex rel. Christiansen v. Everglades College, Inc., Nos. 16-10849/16-11839, — F.3d —, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 7842, 2017 WL 1658478 (11th Cir. May 3, 2017), the Eleventh Circuit recently determined that the United States is not required to satisfy the good-cause intervention standard in 31 U.S.C. § 3730(c)(3) when settling a qui tam action brought under the False Claims Act (“FCA”) over a relator’s objections.  The Court also articulated the standard for determining when a settlement between the United States and an FCA defendant is “fair, adequate, and reasonable” under 31 U.S.C. § 3730(c)(2)(B). (more…)

SHARE
EmailShare
1 2 3 5
XSLT Plugin by BMI Calculator