By

Ellen Robbins

05 May 2016

Cert Petition Asks Supreme Court to Address First-to-File Rule

This past January, we wrote about the First Circuit decision’s in United States ex rel. Gadbois v. PharMerica Corp., No. 14-2164 (1st Cir. Dec. 16, 2015), which addressed the applicability of the first-to-file bar once the first-filed case is dismissed (see here). The first-to-file bar provides that “[w]hen a person brings an action under [the FCA], no person other than the Government may intervene or bring a related action based on the facts underlying the pending action.”  31 U.S.C. § 3730(b)(5).  Although the relator, Gadbois, filed his complaint during the pendency of a related action, the unanimous panel held that settlement of the related action subsequent to the district court’s ruling cured the jurisdictional defect in Gadbois’s complaint.  Accordingly, the First Circuit remanded the case and permitted Gadbois to file a motion for leave to supplement his complaint.

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02 May 2016

Fifth Circuit Affirms Dismissal of Attorney-Relator’s Qui Tam Suit For Violation of Ethical Obligations

Last year, we wrote about a district court decision disqualifying an attorney from serving as relator in a False Claims Act (“FCA”) action that he initiated against his client’s adversary in pending litigation (see here and here).  The attorney and would-be-relator, Donald Holmes, was retained by an insurance company, Munich Re, in connection with arbitration against Northrop Grumman, who had submitted claims for damage to its shipyards allegedly resulting from Hurricane Katrina.  Holmes, on behalf of the insurance company, filed a complaint in federal court to obtain certain documents from the Navy allegedly relevant to the arbitration.  He eventually obtained the documents subject to a protective order that forbade their disclosure outside of the arbitration.  However, Holmes promptly filed an FCA complaint against Northrop, alleging Northrop improperly used government funds allocated to compensate for Hurricane Katrina damage to instead cover cost overruns that occurred before the storm, based on the documents obtained from the Navy —in clear violation of the protective order.

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