25 February 2015

Third Circuit Deems Pharmacist’s Assessment Of Publicly Available Data Insufficient To Qualify Him As An Original Source

Posted by Jaime L.M. Jones and Jessica Rothenberg

In a recent decision, the Third Circuit provided additional guidance on the scope of the original source exception to the FCA’s public disclosure bar. In U.S. ex rel. Morgan v. Express Scripts, Inc., the court affirmed the dismissal of a qui tam suit based on allegations – widely covered in numerous lawsuits and media reports – that defendants artificially inflated Average Wholesale Prices (“AWPs”) for brand-name drugs. Relator David Morgan, a pharmacist, was never employed by any of the defendants and learned of the alleged scheme to inflate AWPs only through his review and comparison of two publicly available price listings. The court explained that knowledge gained through reviewing files—which was the full extent of Morgan’s “diligence” that led to his discovery of the price inflation—is not sufficient to demonstrate the “direct and independent knowledge” that is required to qualify as an original source. The court went on to note that Morgan’s general knowledge of the pharmaceutical industry, although it may have informed his review of the publicly available information, also was not enough to rescue his claims under the original source exception. The court then applied the familiar two step analysis under the public disclosure bar and found that Morgan’s allegations of a price inflation scheme were (1) disclosed in the news media, previously filed lawsuits, and a Congressional report, and (2) based on those public disclosures. In this connection, the court noted that the mere fact that Morgan calculated specific “markups” tied to the allegedly inflated AWPs was not sufficient to “remove his allegations from the public disclosure realm.” Thus, and since Morgan was not the original source of the allegations in his complaint, the court affirmed the district court’s dismissal of his claims for lack of subject matter jurisdiction under the pre-FERA version of the public disclosure bar.

A copy of the Third Circuit’s opinion in U.S. ex rel. Morgan v. Express Scripts, Inc., No. 14-1029 (3d Cir. 2015) can be found here.

SHARE
EmailShare