13 January 2012

Relator Attempting to Avoid The Scope of A Release Pleads Himself Out of Court

Posted by Brad Robertson and Scott Stein

A recent decision explains how one relator, in an effort to plead around a release of FCA claims in favor of his former employer, managed to plead himself right out of court. U.S. ex rel. McNulty v. Reddy Ice Holdings, Inc., No. 08-cv-12728 (E.D. Mich.), December 7, 2011 Slip Op. The relator alleged that his former employer, Arctic Glacier, and two other manufacturers of packaged ice, overcharged the government. These same companies are also currently defending a series of antitrust lawsuits alleging that they conspired to allocate markets. The increased prices resulting from the alleged market allocation form the basis of the relator’s FCA claims in this action.

The plaintiff alleged that he discovered the market allocation conspiracy while employed with Arctic Glacier, and that he was terminated after refusing to participate in the conspiracy. As part of his severance package, he signed a broad release waiving any and all claims against the company for the time period prior to the release.

The defendants moved to dismiss on public disclosure/original source grounds and for failure to plead with sufficient particularity. The relator filed a cross-motion to dismiss Arctic Glacier’s counterclaim that he breached his release agreement. In an attempt to plead around the scope of release, the relator alleged that he learned that the alleged market allocation scheme resulted in overcharges to the United States government from a discussion with a former co-worker only after his termination from Arctic Glacier and after signing the release. Accordingly, he contended that his FCA claims were outside the scope of the release. Ruling on the defendants’ motion to dismiss, the court found the allegations of the discussion with his former co-worker particularly crucial to its 12(b)(6) analysis, as “the only allegations that relate in any way to the FCA claim itself” as opposed to the market allocation conspiracy. The court dismissed the complaint, finding that the allegations of market allocation had been publicly disclosed through the antitrust lawsuits, and that the relator was not an original source of the FCA allegations, as he “was no longer employed by Arctic Glacier at the time and could not possibly have ‘observed’ or ‘learned’ this information firsthand.”

Adding insult to the relator’s injury, the court then proceeded to declare the release that the relator had been attempting to plead around unenforceable, dismissing Arctic Glacier’s counterclaim. Without evidence that the government knew of the claims prior to the execution of the release, the court held, public policy concerns barred enforcement of the agreement as to the FCA claims.

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