By

Scott Stein

15 March 2012

Former Wisconsin AG Files Qui Tam Suit Against Drug Companies

A Wisconsin court recently unsealed a qui tam complaint alleging that several pharmaceutical manufacturers violated Wisconsin’s version of the False Claims Act by publishing false “average wholesale prices” (AWPs) for their drugs, on which the State Medicaid program relied to establish drug reimbursement. This is not the first suit based on allegedly false AWPs. Indeed, AWP litigation has been raging in state and federal courts for the better part of the last decade. But what makes this case unusual is that the qui tam relator is the former Attorney General of Wisconsin, Peggy A. Lautenschlager. As Ms. Lautenschlager notes in the first paragraph of the complaint, it was under her term as Attorney General that the State of Wisconsin sued 38 other drug companies in 2004 for the same alleged conduct. These facts would appear to present obvious problems for the former Attorney General under Wisconsin’s public disclosure bar, but it will be interesting to watch this suit play out.

SHARE
EmailShare
29 February 2012

Obama Budget Reflects Renewed Emphasis on Health Care Fraud

The U.S . Department of Health and Human Services has released its Fiscal Year 2013 “Budget in Brief,” an overview of how HHS proposes to spend the close to $1 billion in budget authority for HHS requested in President Obama’s 2013 budget request. Program integrity is a top priority, with HHS noting that over the last three years, Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control (which comprises $610 million of the budget request) has produced a “return on investment” of $7.20 for every dollar spent. Among the key initiatives these funds will support are a continued emphasis on improper fee-for-service payments by Medicare, expansion of the Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team (HEAT) task forces, and “an increased focused on civil fraud, such as off-label marketing and pharmaceutical fraud.” (page 62).

SHARE
EmailShare
23 February 2012

CMS Issues Guidance on Reporting and Refunding of Overpayments Actionable Under the FCA

Posted by Scott SteinBarbara Cammarata and Catherine Starks

On February 16, 2012, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) released a long-awaited proposed rule (“Proposed Rule“) to implement the overpayment reporting and refund provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA”), which are enforceable in a “reverse false claims” action under the False Claims Act.

Under section 6402 of PPACA, providers and suppliers who have been overpaid by Medicare or Medicaid must report and return the overpayment within the later of: (1) 60 days of the date on which the overpayment is “identified;” or (2) the date any corresponding cost report is due, if applicable, or face reverse false claims liability under the FCA. Although the duty to report and return an overpayment is triggered, in the alternative, from the date the overpayment is “identified,” Congress did not define “identified.” The Proposed Rule defines the term by reference to the FCA’s scienter provisions. Specifically, the Proposed Rule would deem an overpayment to be “identified” when the person has actual knowledge of the existence of the overpayment or acts in reckless disregard or deliberate ignorance of the overpayment, which is how the FCA defines a “knowing” violation of the Act. This standard mirrors that provided in the CMS’ Physician Payment Sunshine Act proposed rule whereby an applicable manufacturer must report payments or transfers of value to a covered recipient when the applicable manufacturer has actual knowledge of or acts in reckless disregard or deliberate ignorance of the identity of the covered recipient.

According to CMS, it incorporated the FCA’s mens rea standard to incentivize providers and suppliers “to exercise reasonable diligence to determine whether an overpayment exists.” In particular, CMS stated that the provision is designed to prevent providers and suppliers from avoiding their obligation to identify potential billing issues through, e.g., self-audits or compliance checks. The Proposed Rule does not otherwise provide guidance as to what steps providers should take to uncover potential billing issues, beyond the requirement to exercise “reasonable diligence,” and that investigations, once initiated, should be conducted “with all deliberate speed.” As evidenced by the case law interpreting the FCA’s “knowingly” standard , there is ample room for CMS and providers and suppliers to disagree regarding whether providers and suppliers have exercised “reasonable diligence” to identify potential overpayments.

Increasing the stakes for providers and suppliers in the event that they fail properly to “identify” an overpayment is the Proposed Rule’s adoption of an FCA-like 10-year “look-back” period. This provision requires providers and suppliers (and allows CMS and qui tam relators) to review any potential overpayments in the prior 10-year period (in contrast to the existing four year CMS reopening period and the three year Recovery Audit Contractor “look back” period). The 10 year look-back period obviously raises the spectre of significant financial liability for providers and suppliers.

As for how overpayments are to be reported, the Proposed Rule adopts CMS’ existing process for voluntary refunds, renamed the “self-reported overpayment refund process” set forth in Publication 100-06, Chapter 4 of the Medicare Financial Management Manual. CMS states that it intends to publish a new form specifically for reporting overpayments under PPACA.

The Proposed Rule also clarifies the relationship between the government’s various self-reporting mechanisms. First, if a provider or supplier reports a violation of the Stark Law through the Medicare Self-Referral Disclosure Protocol, this suspends the obligation to return overpayments, but not to report. In contrast, a provider’s or supplier’s report of potential fraud through the OIG Self-Disclosure Protocol1 both suspends the obligation to return overpayments once the OIG has acknowledged receipt of the submission,2 and constitutes a report for purposes of the Proposed Rule, provided such notification is consistent with the proposed deadlines.

CMS also offers guidance on what constitutes “overpayments” in the context of an alleged violation of the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute (“AKS”). The Proposed Rule notes that that while some overpayments may arise from potential violations of the AKS, third parties to the kickback arrangement do not have a duty to report or return such overpayments unless they have “sufficient knowledge of the arrangement to have identified the resulting overpayment.” In that case, the third party must report the overpayment to CMS, but only the parties to the kickback scheme would be expected to return the overpayment and not the innocent third-party provider or supplier, “except in the most extraordinary circumstances.” While the rule does not expressly apply to manufacturers, this proposed interpretation seems to establish a clear link between claims “tainted” by manufacturer kickbacks and “overpayment” liability. A separate post on this topic will be forthcoming.

While the Proposed Rule expressly applies only to Medicare Part A and B providers and suppliers, and is not final, CMS “remind[s] all stakeholders that even without a final regulation,” they “could face potential False Claims Act liability . . . for failure to report and return an overpayment.”

Comments on the Proposed Rule are due by April 16, 2012.


1 Id. at 9,182.

2 Id. at 9,183.

SHARE
EmailShare
21 February 2012

CitiMortgage Reaches $158 Million Settlement of FCA Claims

Posted by Robert J. Conlan and Scott D. Stein

On February 15, 2012, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York announced that CitiMortgage, Inc., a subsidiary of Citibank N.A., settled a suit asserting violations of the FCA and Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act (FIRREA) arising out of allegations that CitiMortgage failed to comply with certain HUD-FHA requirements with respect to certain loans and submitted certifications to HUD-FHA stating that certain loans were eligible for FHA mortgage insurance when in fact they were not. As part of the settlement, CitiMortgage has agreed to pay $158.3 million in damages to the United States and a relator under the FCA.

The settlement has generated significant press coverage. An article in the American Lawyer notes that the settlement reflects the third case in less than a year in which DOJ has asserted FCA claims against a major financial institution for conduct relating to mortgage loans. Business Week reports on the settlement in an article titled “More Financial Whistleblowing Is On The Way.” And Reuters has an interesting article on the genesis of the suit, including an interview with the whistleblower, who remains an employee of CitiGroup.

SHARE
EmailShare
24 January 2012

New Report Reinforces The Role Effective Internal Reporting Policies Play In Preventing Whistleblower Suits

A recent survey of employee attitudes toward whistleblowing reinforces the importance of an effective compliance program in mitigating FCA suits. The Ethics Resource Center recently published its bi-annual National Business Ethics Survey (NBES), a longitudinal study of employee attitudes that seeks to provide a “barometer of workplace ethics.” The survey, a copy of which can be downloaded here, finds that employees perceive “historically low levels of current misconduct in the American workplace.” Specifically,

* The percentage of employees who witnessed misconduct at work fell to a new low of 45 percent. That compares to 49 percent in 2009 and is well down from the record high of 55 percent in 2007.

* Those who reported the bad behavior they saw reached a record high of 65 percent, up from 63 percent two years earlier and 12 percentage points higher than the record low of 53 percent in 2005.

However, the NBES notes that this positive trend is accompanied by “ominous warning signs of a potentially significant ethics decline ahead”:

* Employees who reported misconduct and who reported experiencing some form of retaliation rose to 22 percent, up from 15 percent in 2009 and 12 percent in 2007.

* The percentage of employees who perceived pressure to compromise standards in order to do their jobs climbed five points to 13 percent, just shy of the all-time high of 14 percent in 2000.

* The share of companies perceived as having a weak ethics culture climbed to near record levels at 42 percent, up from 35 percent in 2009.

The NBES also examined the impact of the new Dodd-Frank whistleblower provisions on employee attitudes regarding reporting of employer misconduct. According to the survey, employees say they are far more motivated by the nature of the misconduct and its potential harm than by financial reward. Only three percent of employees who actually reported misconduct said they went outside the company as their first resort. About half (49 percent) said that they would consider reporting to federal authorities under certain circumstances, even if it might cost them their job. An additional five percent said they would report to the federal government, but “only if there was a chance for a substantial financial reward.”

As the study notes, despite the addition of new incentives under Dodd-Frank for whistleblowers to report wrongdoing to the federal government, employees say that they prefer to first report their concerns internally to their employers. The study recognizes that while “[a]s whistleblower protections become more widely known these behaviors may change,” for now, “financial rewards from government agencies do not seem to be enough of a motivator to cause employees to circumvent their employers.” However, the self-reported nature of the survey merits some caution in interpreting these results.

SHARE
EmailShare
13 January 2012

Relator Attempting to Avoid The Scope of A Release Pleads Himself Out of Court

Posted by Brad Robertson and Scott Stein

A recent decision explains how one relator, in an effort to plead around a release of FCA claims in favor of his former employer, managed to plead himself right out of court. U.S. ex rel. McNulty v. Reddy Ice Holdings, Inc., No. 08-cv-12728 (E.D. Mich.), December 7, 2011 Slip Op. The relator alleged that his former employer, Arctic Glacier, and two other manufacturers of packaged ice, overcharged the government. These same companies are also currently defending a series of antitrust lawsuits alleging that they conspired to allocate markets. The increased prices resulting from the alleged market allocation form the basis of the relator’s FCA claims in this action.

The plaintiff alleged that he discovered the market allocation conspiracy while employed with Arctic Glacier, and that he was terminated after refusing to participate in the conspiracy. As part of his severance package, he signed a broad release waiving any and all claims against the company for the time period prior to the release.

The defendants moved to dismiss on public disclosure/original source grounds and for failure to plead with sufficient particularity. The relator filed a cross-motion to dismiss Arctic Glacier’s counterclaim that he breached his release agreement. In an attempt to plead around the scope of release, the relator alleged that he learned that the alleged market allocation scheme resulted in overcharges to the United States government from a discussion with a former co-worker only after his termination from Arctic Glacier and after signing the release. Accordingly, he contended that his FCA claims were outside the scope of the release. Ruling on the defendants’ motion to dismiss, the court found the allegations of the discussion with his former co-worker particularly crucial to its 12(b)(6) analysis, as “the only allegations that relate in any way to the FCA claim itself” as opposed to the market allocation conspiracy. The court dismissed the complaint, finding that the allegations of market allocation had been publicly disclosed through the antitrust lawsuits, and that the relator was not an original source of the FCA allegations, as he “was no longer employed by Arctic Glacier at the time and could not possibly have ‘observed’ or ‘learned’ this information firsthand.”

Adding insult to the relator’s injury, the court then proceeded to declare the release that the relator had been attempting to plead around unenforceable, dismissing Arctic Glacier’s counterclaim. Without evidence that the government knew of the claims prior to the execution of the release, the court held, public policy concerns barred enforcement of the agreement as to the FCA claims.

SHARE
EmailShare
10 January 2012

District Court Dismisses False Certification Claim For Failure to Adequately Plead “Condition of Payment”

By Scott Stein and Erik Ives

In the first in-depth application of the Third Circuit’s decision in United States ex rel. Wilkins v. United Health Group, Inc., No. 10-2747, 2011 WL 2573390 (3d Cir. June 30, 2011)adopting the implied certification theory of liability, the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey dismissed at the pleading stage a relator’s claims under the federal False Claims Act (FCA) for failure adequately to plead that the defendant had violated a condition of payment. See Foglia v. Renal Ventures Management, LLC, No. 09-1552, Slip Op. (D.N.J. Nov. 23, 2011).

The Relator alleged that the Defendant (a dialysis care services company) failed to comply with New Jersey regulations concerning quality of patient care and facility staffing, and Center for Disease Control (CDC) standards concerning reuse of vials of the drug Zemplar. The Relator contended that these violations rendered each claim for payment of the drug legally false under a theory of express and/or implied false certification. The United States declined to intervene in the matter, and after the case was unsealed the defendant filed a motion for partial judgment on the pleadings pursuant to Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(c).

The Court began its analysis by describing the false certification theory, as recently outlined by the Third Circuit in United States ex rel. Wilkins v. United Health Group, Inc., No. 10-2747, 2011 WL 2573390 (3d Cir. June 30, 2011). In doing so, the Court focused on the Third Circuit’s holding that:

‘[T]o plead a claim upon which relief could be granted under a false certification theory, either express or implied, a plaintiff must show that compliance with the regulation which the defendant allegedly violated was a condition of payment from the Government.”

<em&ggt;Foglia, Slip Op. at 24-25 (quoting Wilkins, 2011 WL 2573390 at *11). Applying this condition of payment requirement to Relator’s pleadings under Fed. R. Civ. P. 8(a)(2) (requiring a “short and plain statement” of the claim entitling pleader to relief) and Fed. R. Civ. P. 9(b) (establishing heightened pleading requirements for claims implicating fraud), the Court held that Relator’s “merely conclusory” assertion that compliance with the federal and state regulations in question was a precondition of payment was legally insufficient. The Court explained that Relator’s failure to “cite any rule, regulation, contract, or other facts to demonstrate” this contention required dismissal of Relator’s claim on the pleadings. Foglia, Slip Op. at 25-29.

SHARE
EmailShare
19 December 2011

DOJ Announces Record FCA Recoveries in 2011

On December 19, the Department of Justice announced that during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011, it obtained over $3 billion in settlements and judgments under the False Claims Act. A few items of note:

  • Over 90% of the amount recovered resulted from whistleblower suits. According to DOJ, a record 638 qui tam suits were filed in FY2011.
  • 80% of the total recoveries involved alleged healthcare fraud, with the bulk ($2.2 billion) directed toward the pharmaceutical industry.
  • DOJ obtained $358 million from “non-war related procurement and consumer-related financial fraud” cases, a category that includes grant, housing and mortgage fraud that emerged in the wake of the financial crisis.
  • In addition to FCA recoveries, DOJ secured $1.3 billion in criminal fines, forfeitures, restitution, and disgorgement under the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA).
SHARE
EmailShare
12 December 2011

Tennessee Prosecutors Ramping Up FCA Enforcement

A December 3 article in the Daily News Journal (Murfreesboro, TN) reporting on the recent indictment of the owners of an ambulance company for Medicare fraud discusses the increasing focus on healthcare fraud cases by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Middle District of Tennessee. According to the article, Jerry Martin, the current U.S. Attorney, said in a recent speech that his office is “absolutely looking for [FCA} business,” and recently has doubled the number of prosecutors working on FCA cases. While the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Tennessee is not as well-known as its counterparts in other locales (such as Boston and Philadelphia) for its FCA work, it has announced a number of healthcare FCA verdicts or settlements in 2011 relating to medical devices, diagnostic testing, and nursing homes.

SHARE
EmailShare
10 December 2011

DOJ Intervenes in FCA Suit Against Hospice Company

Posted by Scott Stein and Allison Reimann

On December 6, 2011, the Department of Justice intervened in an FCA suit against AseraCare Hospice, a hospice provider with facilities in nineteen states. The lawsuit, filed in 2009 by two former AseraCare employees, alleges that AseraCare knowingly filed false claims to Medicare for hospice care for patients who were not terminally ill. The DOJ’s complaint alleges that AseraCare, by pressuring employees to reach aggressive Medicare targets, admitted and retained individuals who were ineligible for Medicare hospice benefits—even after being alerted to problems by an internal auditor.

The case is United States ex rel. Richardson v. Golden Gate Ancillary LLC d/b/a AseraCare Hospice, No. 09-CV-00627, and is pending before Judge Abdul Kallon in the Northern District of Alabama. As reported by Bloomberg News, the DOJ’s complaint in intervention is part of a wider federal crackdown of suspected fraud by hospice providers.

SHARE
EmailShare
XSLT Plugin by BMI Calculator