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July 6, 2012

06 July 2012

District Court Dismisses Qui Tam Claims Due To Relator’s Failure To Plead Intent In Light Of Regulatory Ambiguity

In a decision released yesterday, Judge Robreno of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania dismissed all FCA claims against nine pharmaceutical manufacturers pursuant to Rule 8(a), finding that relator had failed to plead any evidence they acted knowingly or recklessly in light of regulatory ambiguity. U.S. ex rel. Streck v. Allergan, et al., No. 08-5135 (E.D.P.A. Jul. 3, 2012). Relator’s claims against those defendants were based on allegations that they had improperly calculated Average Manufacturer Price (“AMP”) by including certain price increases that triggered credits owed by wholesalers in the calculation of service fees owed to those wholesalers, which fees were in turn excluded from the manufacturers’ calculation of AMP as “bona fide service fees.” Relying on Safeco Ins. Co. of Am. v. Burr, 551 U.S. 47 (2007), Robreno held that due to the lack of any statutory or regulatory guidance regarding price appreciation credits and the calculation of AMP, relator was required but had failed to plead facts to show that defendants’ interpretation of those regulations was unreasonable. The court found that the conduct of those manufacturers was “not unreasonable, let alone reckless,” and dismissed all claims against them with prejudice as to the relator.

The court also dismissed in part the claims against another group of four manufacturers. These “discount defendants” were alleged to have included service fees paid to wholesalers as discounts in their calculations of AMP. While the court dismissed all claims against the discount defendants for conduct prior to 2007, it allowed later claims to proceed based on regulatory developments occurring in 2007.

This decision, like the Supreme Court’s decision in Christopher v. SmithKlineBeecham Corp., recently reported on this blog, should give relators’ counsel and the government pause when considering FCA claims based on alleged violations of ambiguous statutes or regulations.

Sidley represented three of the defendants against whom all claims were dismissed in the litigation.

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